Get SF Weekly Newsletters
Pin It

"Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb": The Film, Like the Characters, Keeps Coming Back to Life 

Tuesday, Dec 16 2014
Comments

Shawn Levy's third and allegedly final Night at the Museum film is subtitled Secret of the Tomb even though we only briefly see a tomb. This is probably because Goes to London isn't nearly as marketable, and Robin Williams' Final Live-Action Performance would be too morbid. A sense of melancholy does hang over the shockingly not-terrible film, likely built into the script before anyone knew it would be Williams' last movie. Storywise, night watchman Larry (Ben Stiller) travels to the British Museum with Teddy Roosevelt (Williams) and other historical exhibits to fix the magical doodad that grants them life, lest they all remain inanimate forever. Along for the ride is Larry's boring son Nick (Skyler Gisondo) for a boring subplot about Larry not being able to let Nick become his own man, yawn. That stultifying plotline notwithstanding, Secret of the Tomb has all the CGI shenanigans one expects from this series — including a genuinely clever trip inside M. C. Escher's Relativity — and a running gay-panic joke which is not okay, but it's most effective in its quieter moments. Unsurprisingly, some of the funniest lines are clearly improvisations, and Williams gets in a few good ones. It ain't The Fisher King, but considering how his career went, he could have had a much worse sign-off.

About The Author

Sherilyn Connelly

Related Locations

Comments


Comments are closed.

Popular Stories

  1. Most Popular Stories
  2. Stories You Missed

Slideshows

  • clipping at Brava Theater Sept. 11
    Sub Pop recording artists 'clipping.' brought their brand of noise-driven experimental hip hop to the closing night of 2016's San Francisco Electronic Music Fest this past Sunday. The packed Brava Theater hosted an initially seated crowd that ended the night jumping and dancing against the front of the stage. The trio performed a set focused on their recently released Sci-Fi Horror concept album, 'Splendor & Misery', then delved into their dancier and more aggressive back catalogue, and recent single 'Wriggle'. Opening performances included local experimental electronic duo 'Tujurikkuja' and computer music artist 'Madalyn Merkey.'"