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Misc. Reviews 

If it's kinda, sorta music-related, we'll review it. This week: Voices From the Frontline

Wednesday, Apr 26 2006
"Any sins that I committed, I have to answer to God," raps Anthony Alvin Hodge, the 22-year-old Marine corporal who rhymes as Amp. Out of context, Hodge's sentiment is a near cliche of tough-guy military-speak, but 19 tracks into Voices From the Frontline, a compilation of hip hop and R 'n' B by American soldiers serving in Iraq, Hodge's scratchy field recording can give you the chills.

We're all but numb to the Hollywood wedding of war and pop music — put on "Paint It Black" or "Flight of the Valkyries" and try not to picture flocks of olive-green helicopters — and Voices' greatest accomplishment is its ability to distinguish itself from another hackneyed Jarhead soundtrack, as a real statement about life in the shit. It's different from the canon of war music for an important reason: Technology has enabled this collection to be written and released by personnel who are actually on the frontlines. Recorded on jerry-rigged X-boxes and handheld devices, this is a real-time war album.

The perspectives on document are just as distinctive. The beats backing tunes like "Girl at War" and "Ain't the Same" might not be breaking musical ground — both have a heavily produced club aesthetic that could've been plucked from KMEL circa 2002 — but the subjects of the rhymes (dealing with sexism as a female in the service and the psychological empowerment of enlistment, respectively) can only be legitimately addressed by these artists. This idea is underscored when a skilled MC like Prophet (Sgt. Chris Tomlinson, 300th Military Police Co.) takes on Improvised Explosive Devices, Kuwaiti pop culture, or fallen comrades. When production does get innovative — like the lofting beat and vocal hook that drive "Condolence" — Voices stands not only as a fascinating historical document but a vivid musical one, too.

About The Author

Nate Cavalieri


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