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Our critics weigh in on local theater

Wednesday, Apr 2 2008

Shopping! The Musical. The world is made up of two kinds of people — those who like musical revues and those who really, really don't. Writer and director Morris Bobrow's original compilation of song and skits is unlikely to convert anyone, but its 80 minutes are filled with plenty of amusing harmonized insights into everyone's favorite pastime. Who hasn't gritted their teeth at the quasi-ethnic knickknacks at street fairs? And, yeah, what exactly are handling fees? The evening could do with more variety of musical and performance styles; it falls back too often on the softly building show tune and the big-eyed, winking delivery. But as they enter the third year of their run in March, Bobrow and his cast and crew have honed an enjoyable formula that keeps you smiling — if not always singing — along. Ongoing at the Shelton Theater, 533 Sutter (at Powell), S.F. Tickets are $27-$29; call 392-8860 or visit (Molly Rhodes) Reviewed Jan. 2.

Tings Dey Happen. Based on his experiences as a Fulbright Scholar studying oil politics in Nigeria (American's fifth-biggest oil supplier), solo performer Dan Hoyle drills deep beneath the surface of media hype and NGO cant to help us understand the forces at work behind the oil-rich country's escalating cycle of corruption and violence. On his journey backward and forward between Nigeria's oil capital, Port Harcourt, and the lawless hinterlands of the Niger Delta, Hoyle — with acute attention to physical detail (and an ear for pidgin) — embodies a soft-spoken, 23-year-old rebel sniper whose chief desire is to obtain a university degree; a warlord armed with four cellphones and a family photo album, like Marlon Brando in The Godfather; and a nerdy Japanese member of the Young Diplomats Club in Lagos working on a thesis about the Tanzanian cashew nut, among many others. Like Anna Deavere Smith, one of the most famous practitioners of this style of show, Hoyle takes a journalistic approach. But unlike Smith, whose slavish impersonation of the speech nuances of her interviewees seems more stenography than artistry, Hoyle filters his Nigerian experience through his vivid imagination, creating full-blooded characters that are as theatrical as they are real. Through April 19 at the Marsh, 1062 Valencia (at 21st St.), S.F. Tickets are $15-$22; call 826-5750 or visit (Chloe Veltman) Reviewed Jan. 10, 2007.

Wishful Drinking. Carrie Fisher's solo show feels less like a play and more like cocktails over at her house. Within five minutes, Fisher has kicked off her shoes, poured herself a massive glass of Diet Coke, lit a clove cigarette, and asked the audience if they have any questions. While obviously there's a scripted tale to be told about her life in and out of rehab and the tabloids, Fisher has a generous personality and clearly enjoys plenty of audience interaction. On a beautifully designed living room set by Alexander V. Nichols, images and bits of film are projected to accompany her tumultuous life. Fisher was the celebrity spawn of 1950s teen idols Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fisher, and, as many know from her book Postcards from the Edge, she had quite an affinity for drugs ("Some say religion is the opiate of the masses, but for me, I took opiates religiously"). The Star Wars segment will seem all too brief for fans, but is highlighted with George Lucas' declaration that there is no underwear in space. Her marriage to Paul Simon is absorbing (who knew that much of his album Rhythm of the Saints was all about her?), but this play is rooted solidly in her diagnosis as a manic-depressive. Some segments border on self-indulgence, and 30 minutes could easily be trimmed, but it is undeniably appealing watching Fisher expose the beautiful and ugly bits of her life with such a big heart. Through April 12 at Berkeley Rep, 2015 Addison (at Shattuck), Berkeley. Tickets are $16.50-$59; call 510-647-2949 or visit (Nathaniel Eaton) Reviewed March 12.

Actors Reading Writers: Popular local actors read modern and classic short stories. First Monday of every month, 7:30 p.m., free. Berkeley City Club, 2315 Durant (at Ellsworth), Berkeley, 510-843-4822.

BATS: Sunday Players: Each week Bay Area Theatresports players pit their improv work against all comers as the audience votes them off one by one. Sundays, 8 p.m., $8, Fort Mason, Bldg. B (Marina & Buchanan), 474-6776.

Beach Blanket Babylon: A North Beach perennial featuring crazy hats, media personality caricatures, a splash of romance, and little substance. $25-$65, Club Fugazi, 678 Green (at Powell), 421-4222.

The Better Half: The U.S. premiere of a lost Noel Coward play. Through May 3, 8 p.m., $20-$69. The Hypnodrome, 575 10th St. (at Bryant), 248-1900,

Big City Improv: Actors take audience suggestions and create comedy from nothing. Fridays, 10 p.m., $15, Shelton Theater, 533 Sutter (at Powell), 433-1226,

Billy Connolly Live!: The famed British comedian, alone on an S.F. stage. Through April 12. Post Street Theatre, 450 Post (at Mason), 321-2900,

The Comedy of Errors: Presented by the African-American Shakespeare Company. Through April 13, $20-$25, African American Art and Cultural Complex Center, 762 Fulton (at Webster), 394-5854.

Fences: August Wilson's drama about Troy Maxon, a former star of the Negro Leagues, who works as a garbage man in 1957. First Thursday-Sunday of every month. Continues through April 20. Lorraine Hansberry Theatre, 620 Sutter (at Mason), 474-8800,

Future Me: Stephen Brown's drama about an unforgivable crime. Starting April 3, Thursdays-Sundays. Continues through May 4. Berkeley City Club, 2315 Durant (at Ellsworth), Berkeley, 510-843-4822.

The Government Inspector: Nikolai Gogol's play plays out in a backwater Russian village, where government leaders and local cronies are willing to give a visiting official money, women, and whatever else he wants — just as long as he gives them a good report back at the capital. Through April 20. American Conservatory Theater, 415 Geary (at Mason), 749-2228,

hotshot: Terrence Beswick's drama about men and their obsessions: sex, love, and crystal meth. Starting April 3, Thursdays-Saturdays. Continues through April 26. Mama Calizo's Voice Factory, 1519 Mission (at Van Ness), 690-9410,

For All the Babies' Fathers: Staged reading of Molly Rhodes' play about a pregnant couple. Tue., April 8, 7:30 p.m. The Custom Stage, 965 Mission St. (at sixth), 838-3006,

Insignificant Others: An open run of L. Jay Kuo's musical, directed by George Quick, about five friends who move to San Francisco from the Midwest. Daily, Theatre 39 at Pier 39, 2 Beach (Beach & Embarcadero).

Love, Chaos & Dinner: A blend of European cabaret, circus arts, and original music with a five-course gourmet dinner. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 6 p.m.; Sundays, 5 p.m., $99-$125, Pier 29, Embarcadero (at Battery), 273-1620.

Luv: A comedy that takes place on a suspension bridge, where three friends battle existential woes. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through April 5. Actors Theatre San Francisco, 855 Bush (at Taylor), 345-1287.

Manners and Civility: A psychological drama of kidnapping and morality by Nick Olivero. Starting April 3, Thursdays-Sundays. Continues through April 12. Boxcar Playhouse, 505 Natoma (at Sixth St.), 776-1747,

Monday Night Marsh: Each week a different lineup of musicians, actors, performance artists, and others takes the stage at this regular event. Mondays, $7. The Marsh, 1062 Valencia (at 22nd St.), 826-5750,

Monkey Room: Kevin Fisher's comedy about lab monkeys and HIV. First Wednesday-Sunday of every month. Continues through May 4. Magic Theatre, Fort Mason, Bldg. D (Marina & Buchanan), 441-8822,

Murder Mystery Dinner: A murder mystery dinner that begins with detectives gathering to split $5 million in royalties from their latest book. Includes fruit and cheese reception and three-course dinner. One Saturday a month. Call for specific date. Saturdays, 6 p.m., $95, Queen Anne Hotel, 1590 Sutter (at Octavia), 441-2828.

The Pandora Experiment: A "slightly creepy" show by award-winning magician and illusionist Christian Cagigal. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through April 12, $12-$20, Exit Stage Left, 156 Eddy (between Taylor & Mason), 673-3847.

Riches: Lee Blessing's drama about a marriage that goes wrong. April 5-27. Phoenix Theatre, 414 Mason (at Geary), Suite 601, 989-0023.

School for Scandal: Richard Brinsley Sheridan's comedy about gossip and deceit. April 3-6. Randall Museum Theater, 199 Museum (at Roosevelt), 554-9600.

Strange Travel Suggestions: Improvised monologues that inspired wanderlust. Starting April 3, Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through April 26. The Marsh, 1062 Valencia (at 22nd St.), 826-5750,

Student Gypsy: Rick Besoyan's spoof, described as "a Romberg operetta crossed with a zany Marx Brothers farce." Thursdays-Sundays. Continues through April 13. Eureka Theatre, 215 Jackson (at Front), 788-7469,

Target Teen One-Acts Festival: Starting April 4, Thursdays-Sundays. Continues through April 12. Berkeley Repertory School of Theatre, 2071 Addison (at Shattuck), Berkeley, 510-647-2972,

Teatro ZinZanni: A bewitching evening of European cabaret, cirque arts, theatrical spectacle, and original live music, all blended with a five-course gourmet dinner, set in the nightclub of your dreams, now in its eighth season in San Francisco. Current show is À La Folie, starring Liliane Montevecchi. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 6 p.m., $116-$140, 438-2668, Pier 29, Embarcadero (at Battery).

Thrill Me: The Leopold and Loeb Story: Stephen Dolginoff's take on "the thrill killers." Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through April 4. New Conservatory Theatre Center, 25 Van Ness (at Market), 861-8972,

Tony 'n' Tina's Wedding: Be a part of the wedding reception at Tony 'n' Tina's Wedding. Thursdays-Saturdays, Theatre 39 at Pier 39, 2 Beach (Beach & Embarcadero).

Viva Variety: The popular bimonthly shows always feature queer and queer-friendly musicians, actors, poets, comics, and unclassifiable performers, with proceeds going to various local charities. Second Tuesday of every other month, 8 p.m., $15, for more information call 863-0741. Buriel Clay Theater, 762 Fulton (at Webster).

Wendy Play: A play presented by ACT's MFA and Young Conservatory programs about a young playwright. Wednesdays-Saturdays. Continues through April 5. Zeum Theater, 221 Fourth St. (at Howard), 820-3320.

Whistle Down the Wind: Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical about a stranger claiming to be Jesus Christ. Through April 20. Curran Theatre, 445 Geary (between Taylor and Mason), 551-2000.

Xerxes: Pocket Opera's look into the private life of the king of Persia. Starting April 5, Saturdays. Continues through April 12. Legion of Honor, 100 34th Ave. (near Clement), 863-3330,


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