Get SF Weekly Newsletters

Audio

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Listen to This Podcast on Processed Food With Danny Bowien, Gabrielle Hamilton, and Michael Moss, Author of Salt Sugar Fat

Posted By on Tue, Mar 12, 2013 at 3:30 PM

salt_sugar_fat_cover.jpg

Mission Chinese Food wunderkind Danny Bowien appears on a podcast for Bon Appetit with Michael Moss, author of the upcoming book Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us. (You probably read the excerpt in New York Times Magazine a few weeks ago, or at least heard about it at a dinner party.) Also in the mix are Gabrielle Hamilton, the chef/owner of New York's Prune and author of the culinary memoir Blood, Bones and Butter; and Bon Appetit columnist Andrew Knowlton. Moss's book is about the methods in which the convenience food industry gets customers addicted to its sweet, salty, sugary products, and it's worth a listen to hear what he and the chefs have to say about it.

See also: Taste-Testing Campbell's New Hipster Soups

Whole Foods Announces It Will Require GMO Labeling by 2018

Marshmallow, PB&J, Bacon: The Extreme Vodka Taste Test

Continue reading »

  • Pin It

Friday, January 14, 2011

'Foodie Chap': Liam Mayclem Launching Chefs' Radio Segment, Website

Posted By on Fri, Jan 14, 2011 at 1:16 PM

Liam Mayclem's chef-interview radio segments (with companion website) launch Jan. 17 on KCBS. - CBS5
  • CBS5
  • Liam Mayclem's chef-interview radio segments (with companion website) launch Jan. 17 on KCBS.

Local TV host Liam Mayclem began his media career in the U.K. as a teenager working for BBC Radio. He's returning to his radio roots for "Foodie Chap," a new chef-oriented feature airing daily, short segments between 6-7 a.m. and 6-7 p.m., on KCBS (740 AM and 106.9 FM). A companion website, FoodieChap.com, launches on Monday along with Mayclem's radio spots. [Update, Jan. 17: The site FoodieChap.com is now scheduled to go live Wed., Jan. 19.]

In his reporting role as host of CBS5's Eye on the Bay, Mayclem often gets to cook with and explore the food of some great local chefs. But he found that some of the best bits happen when the cameras are off, and never make it to broadcast. Mayclem says it's those moments that have inspired his new venture.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, September 2, 2010

Don't Sound Like a Tool: How to Pronounce Local Chefs' Names

Posted By on Thu, Sep 2, 2010 at 4:11 PM

Tim LOO-yim of The Attic. - CAROLYN JUNG/FOOD GAL
  • Carolyn Jung/Food Gal
  • Tim LOO-yim of The Attic.

Nothing is more humiliating than name-checking some chef you supposedly have a deep personal bond with ― or have cooked under ― and getting his or her name wrong. There are chefs SFoodie has been writing about for years we refer to by first name rather than look the fool. So we asked summer contributor Trevor Felch ― a restaurant critic at the Claremount Colleges during the school year ― to call around, asking each chef or a member of the chef's staff to pronounce his or her name. Now we're just praying we repeated his pronunciations correctly:

Continue reading »

  • Pin It

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Don't Sound Like a Tool: How to Pronounce Salumi Varieties

Posted By on Tue, Aug 17, 2010 at 4:36 PM

'Nduja: DOO-yah. The "n" is silent. - ANN L./YELP
  • Ann L./Yelp
  • 'Nduja: DOO-yah. The "n" is silent.
Don't Sound Like a Tool is SFoodie's series of audio pronunciation guides to sort-of-common-but-not-obvious words we keep encountering on wine lists and menus. No more shame, no more pointing, no more godawful imitations of a language you don't speak.

The past five years have seen a proliferation of housemade salumi. New varieties and subvarieties of cured pork appear weekly, the payoff for stumbling over their names a gust of pork fat and spice. SFoodie asked Mark Pastore, co-founder of Boccalone, to read through a list of some of the commonly mispronounced types of salumi spotted at local restaurants and charcuteries.
'Nduja: DOO-yah. The "n" is silent. - ANN L./YELP
  • Ann L./Yelp
  • 'Nduja: DOO-yah. The "n" is silent.


Continue reading »

  • Pin It

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Don't Sound Like a Tool: How to Pronounce Pasta Shapes

Posted By on Wed, Jul 14, 2010 at 10:24 AM

hednotool.jpg
Don't Sound Like a Tool is SFoodie's series of audio pronunciation guides to sort-of-common-but-not-obvious words we keep encountering

on wine lists and menus. No more shame, no more pointing, no more

godawful imitations of a language you don't speak.

Given America's long love affair with Italian cuisine ― from the era of baked ziti to the current decade of agnolotti dal plin ― it's surprising so many of us f$#k up the names of our favorite pastas. Here, SFoodie has picked a few of our favorite, less-than-comfortable-to-pronounce pastas to sound out (quite a few of these come from the menu at Quince, always a good place for spotting varieties you have to practice saying in your head before ordering). The goal isn't to sound Italian, just to make sure you know how to order lunch.

When you grab a fistful of tagliatelle, skip the hard g. - EEKIM/FLICKR
  • eekim/Flickr
  • When you grab a fistful of tagliatelle, skip the hard g.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It

Tags: , , , ,

Friday, July 9, 2010

Enotria iPhone App Offers Wine Pronunciation Tips

Posted By on Fri, Jul 9, 2010 at 5:20 PM

rsz_enotria_grab.png
The food world is a mispronunciation minefield, especially as dishes and ingredients from around the world become commonplace on more restaurant menus. SFoodie's "Don't Sound Like a Tool" series strives to keep you out of most trouble, but wine is where it gets complicated. With so many regions, appellations, and grape varietals, it's easy to stumble, particularly when serving or ordering a German Trockenbeerenauslese, or after a couple of bottles from Italy's Trentino-Alto Adige region.

Local wine consultant Melissa Lavrinc Smith hopes to change all that with the first and only audio app for wine pronunciation, the Enotria Guide for iPhone/iPod Touch. The cost: $2.99, available at the App Store.

At launch, there are 200 terms, initially covering France, Germany, and Italy, but with planned free updates in the future to include Spain and Austria. Some basics:

Continue reading »

  • Pin It

Tags: , , , ,

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Don't Sound Like a Tool: More of the Most Garbled Menu Words Ever

Posted By on Wed, Jun 30, 2010 at 9:26 AM

hednotool.jpg
Don't Sound Like a Tool

is SFoodie's series of audio pronunciation

guides to sort-of-common-but-not-obvious words we keep encountering

on wine lists and menus. No more shame, no more pointing, no more

godawful imitations of a language you don't speak.

Last week, SFoodie created an audio pronunciation guide for menu words we hear mispronounced all the time. At the end of the post, we asked for suggestions from readers. And oh, did you have some. They were so good that this week, we've created a new master list incorporating readers' suggestions. Once again, all pronunciations were confirmed against Merriam-Wester. (Also, feel free to check the Don't Sound Like a Tool archives for additional guides to French cheeses and Vietnamese and Filipino dishes, among others.)

How could we have forgotten geoduck (GOO-ee-duck)? - USDA/FLICKR
  • USDA/Flickr
  • How could we have forgotten geoduck (GOO-ee-duck)?

Continue reading »

  • Pin It

Tags: ,

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Don't Sound Like a Tool: The Most Mispronounced Menu Words of All Time

Posted By on Tue, Jun 22, 2010 at 10:06 AM

hednotool.jpg
Don't Sound Like a Tool is SFoodie's series of audio pronunciation guides to sort-of-common-but-not-obvious words we keep encountering

on wine lists and menus. No more shame, no more pointing, no more

godawful imitations of a language you don't speak.

Confit: Pronounced konh-FEE - BOKCHOI&SNOWPEA/FLICKR
It's the visual equivalent of a tongue twister: Half the Americans who know what a prix-fixe menu is don't know how to pronounce the phrase correctly. Those who know which x is pronounced and which is silent have either worked in restaurants or taken a few years of French.

A while back, I put out a Twitter call for other often-mispronounced food words. I compiled the following list from readers' suggestions, adding to it a couple of words I involuntarily screw up (alembic, offal) time and time again. All pronunciations were checked against Merriam-Webster's, with the exception of gyro. (Really? Zheero? For shame, M-W.)

Continue reading »

  • Pin It

Tags: , ,

Friday, June 18, 2010

Don't Sound Like a Tool: How to Pronounce Semi-Arcane Spirits, Part II

Posted By on Fri, Jun 18, 2010 at 2:58 PM

hednotool.jpg
Don't Sound Like a Tool is SFoodie's series of audio pronunciation guides to sort-of-common-but-not-obvious words we keep encountering

on wine lists and menus. No more shame, no more pointing, no more

godawful imitations of a language you don't speak.

SFoodie has successfully proven to ourselves that we'll taste anything ― the bitterest digestifs, the sickliest schnapps, the highest-proof rums. Call us the Andrew Zimmern of the booze world. But the thing we don't know how to do with some of these alcoholic ephemera is pronounce their names. Last week, SFoodie's cocktail guy, Lou Bustamante, demonstrated how to pronounce kinds of spirits such as aguardiente and xtabentún. This week, we set him the task of calling all his bar contacts to come up with comfortable-for-Americans-to-say pronunciations for some of the most mangled brand names appearing on bar shelves.

Hip-no-TEEK or hypnotic? We don't want to order it, we just want to know how to pronounce it.
  • Hip-no-TEEK or hypnotic? We don't want to order it, we just want to know how to pronounce it.

Take it away, Lou:

Continue reading »

  • Pin It

Tags: , , ,

Thursday, June 10, 2010

Don't Sound Like a Tool: How to Pronounce Semi-Arcane Spirits

Posted By on Thu, Jun 10, 2010 at 11:01 AM

These glasses contain Patxaran: PAH-cher-ahn. - THE ASARYA/FLICKR
  • The Asarya/Flickr
  • These glasses contain Patxaran: PAH-cher-ahn.
Don't Sound Like a Tool is SFoodie's series of audio pronunciation guides to sort-of-common-but-not-obvious words we keep encountering on wine lists and menus. No more shame, no more pointing, no more godawful imitations of a language you don't speak.

Everyone knows that any cocktail worth drinking these days contains at least one ingredient you your friends have never heard of before: an artisanal vermouth made by a a couple of biochemists in Iceland, the bartender's in-house rendition of an oyster-mushroom liqueur traditionally made by shepherds in the Lebanese hills. Don't tell us you were thinking of ordering a Jack & Ginger. 

While the best part of encountering all this arcana on bar menus is that it gives drinkers and bartenders something to talk about ― a conversation, we've found, that regularly leads to educational seminars and free sampling ― there's no way you can brag to your friends about what you've just tasted if you can't pronounce the names of the spirits you've just drunk.

These glasses contain Patxaran: PAH-cher-ahn. - THE ASARYA/FLICKR
  • The Asarya/Flickr
  • These glasses contain Patxaran: PAH-cher-ahn.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It

Tags: , ,

Popular Stories

  1. Most Popular Stories
  2. Stories You Missed

Like us on Facebook

Slideshows

  • clipping at Brava Theater Sept. 11
    Sub Pop recording artists 'clipping.' brought their brand of noise-driven experimental hip hop to the closing night of 2016's San Francisco Electronic Music Fest this past Sunday. The packed Brava Theater hosted an initially seated crowd that ended the night jumping and dancing against the front of the stage. The trio performed a set focused on their recently released Sci-Fi Horror concept album, 'Splendor & Misery', then delved into their dancier and more aggressive back catalogue, and recent single 'Wriggle'. Opening performances included local experimental electronic duo 'Tujurikkuja' and computer music artist 'Madalyn Merkey.'"